Educational Exhibit: Reducing Penalties for Marijuana Possession

Texas Policy and Politics 2021: Legislative Issues: https://uh.edu/hobby/tx2021/issues.pdf
Source: The Economic Benefits of Regulating and Taxing Cannabis in Texas, An analysis of potential new revenue, job growth, and savings. Vicente Sederberg LLP, Special Report, October 2020
[1] Texas Department of Public Safety: https://www.dps.texas.gov/sites/default/files/documents/crimereports/19/cit2019.pdf
[2] Office of District Attorney of Harris County:  https://app.dao.hctx.net/MMDP
[1] Individuals convicted of a drug or controlled substance offense will have their driver’s license suspended for 180 days.  https://www.dps.texas.gov/section/driver-license/drug-or-controlled-substance-offenses

[2] State law requires DPS to suspend a license, if the license holder is charged with a Class A, or Class B misdemeanor offense. https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/GV/htm/GV.411.htm#411.187

[3] According to the U.S. Department of Education:  “Is it true that drug convictions might affect my ability to get federal student aid? Yes; your eligibility might be suspended if the offense occurred while you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, or work-study).” https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/eligibility/criminal-convictions#drug-convictions

[4] Whether someone with a misdemeanor record may enlist in the U.S. Armed Services depends on several factors, including the nature, number, seriousness, and circumstances of the crime and when they were committed. Some crimes, unless expunged, are a bar to enlistment. https://www.cga.ct.gov/2005/rpt/2005-R-0556.htm
[5] 8 USC sec. 1227(a)(2)(B)

[6] “PHA/owner has discretion to admit applicants with a history of drug-related offenses…” https://affordablehousingonline.com/guide/criminal-records-housing/hud-requirements

[7] https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/crimconvict.htm

[8] If a Texas resident and U.S. Citizen wishes to work overseas for which a work visa is required they often must undergo a criminal background check and must provide a “certificate of good conduct” or “lack of a criminal record”.  https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/while-abroad/criminal-record-checks.html
[1] Yahoo News/Marist (2017): http://maristpoll.marist.edu/yahoo-newsmarist-poll/#sthash.ouoftt0u.dpbs

[2] According to the U.S. Department of Education:  “Is it true that drug convictions might affect my ability to get federal student aid? Yes; your eligibility might be suspended if the offense occurred while you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, or work-study).” https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/eligibility/criminal-convictions#drug-convictions

[3] “PHA/owner has discretion to admit applicants with a history of drug-related offenses…” https://affordablehousingonline.com/guide/criminal-records-housing/hud-requirements
[4]  https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/crimconvict.htm

[5] Whether someone with a misdemeanor record may enlist in the U.S. Armed Services depends on several factors, including the nature, number, seriousness, and circumstances of the crime and when they were committed. Some crimes, unless expunged, are a bar to enlistment. https://www.cga.ct.gov/2005/rpt/2005-R-0556.htm

[6] Individuals convicted of a drug or controlled substance offense will have their driver’s license suspended for 180 days.  https://www.dps.texas.gov/section/driver-license/drug-or-controlled-substance-offenses
[7] State law requires DPS to suspend a license, if the license holder is charged with a Class A, or Class B misdemeanor offense. https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/GV/htm/GV.411.htm#411.187

[8] 8 USC sec. 1227(a)(2)(B)

[9] If a Texas resident and U.S. Citizen wishes to work overseas for which a work visa is required they often must undergo a criminal background check and must provide a “certificate of good conduct” or “lack of a criminal record”.  https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/while-abroad/criminal-record-checks.html

[10] https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/crimconvict.htm
[1] National Institute on Drug Abuse, December 17, 2018 press release
[2] CNN/ORC International survey, January 6, 2014.
[3] “Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base,” p. 6, Institute of Medicine (1999)
[4] DEA Chief Administrative Law Judge, Francis Young https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1071664/
[5] National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine https://www.nap.edu/read/4421/chapter/5#401
[6] DEA Drug Fact Sheet (2020) https://www.dea.gov/sites/default/files/2020-06/Marijuana-Cannabis-2020.pdf
Texas Department of Public Safety: https://www.dps.texas.gov/sites/default/files/documents/crimereports/19/cit2019.pdf
[1]  https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/field_document/tale_of_two_countries_racially_targeted_arrests_in_the_era_of_marijuana_reform_revised_7.1.20_0.pdf
[2]  https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/new-dallas-cite-and-release-stats-show-more-of-the-same-10604378
[3]  9/13/19 – Austin City Council’s Judicial Committee Meeting as reported by APD Assistant Chief Gay
[4]  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33017750/
Source: Marijuana Policy Project